Wednesday, May 27, 2015

How Quickly We Forget! Lewis Wickes Hine, Eugène Atget, Dorothea Lange, Gordon Parks, Ingeborg Hermine,

Lewis Wickes Hine (September 26, 1874 – November 3, 1940) was an American sociologist and photographer. Hine used his camera as a tool for social reform. His photographs were instrumental in changing the child labor laws in the United States.

HINE, LEWIS W. (1874-1940) 
Family group at Ellis Island (with immigrants behind a hurricane fence). Silver contact print, 4 3/4x5 3/4 inches (12.1x17.1 cm.), with a Hine Photo Company, Yonkers, N.Y. hand stamp and numeric notations, in ink and in pencil, on verso. 1905-12

Hine was born in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in 1874. Hine studied sociology at the University of Chicago, Columbia University and New York University. He became a teacher in New York City at the Ethical Culture School, where he encouraged his students to use photography as an educational medium.

HINE, LEWIS W. (1874-1940) 
Young woman in native costume, Ellis Island. Silver contact print, 7x5 inches (17.8x12.7 cm.), with a Hine Photo Company, Yonkers, N.Y. hand stamp and numeric notations, in ink and in pencil, on verso. 1905-12

Hine traveled to Ellis Island in New York Harbor, photographing the thousands of immigrants who arrived each day. Between 1904 and 1909, Hine took over 200 plates (photographs), and eventually came to the realization that documentary photography could be employed as a tool for social change and reform.

HINE, LEWIS W. (1874-1940) 
Three women and a baby at Ellis Island. Silver contact print, 4 3/4x6 3/4 inches (12.1x17.1 cm.), with a Hine Photo Company, Yonkers, N.Y. hand stamp and numeric notations, in ink and in pencil, on verso. 1905-12

HINE, LEWIS W. (1874-1940) 
Ellis Island (men and women waiting on a bench). Silver contact print, 4 3/4x6 3/4 inches (12.1x17.1 cm.), with a Hine Photo Company, Yonkers, N.Y. hand stamp and numeric notations, in ink and in pencil, on verso. 1905-12


Lewis W. Hine 
Peace, Ellis Island, New York
Date:1905
Medium:Gelatin silver print, printed 1942

Dimensions:5 13/16 x 4 3/8" (14.7 x 11.1 cm)

Lewis W. Hine
Italian Family Looking for Lost Baggage, Ellis Island, New York
Date:1905
Medium:Gelatin silver print, 
printed 1942

Dimensions:5 9/16 x 4 5/16" (14.1 x 10.9 cm)


Lewis W. Hine
A customs official attaches labels to the coats of a German immigrant family at the Registry Hall at Ellis Island. 
Date:1905
Medium:Gelatin silver print, 

(Getty Images)


Lewis W. Hine
Ellis Island Processing
Date:1905

Medium:Gelatin silver print


Lewis W. Hine 
Brooklyn Museum

Climbing into the Promised Land Ellis Island


Lewis W. Hine 
Sadie Pfeifer, a Cotton Mill Spinner, 
Lancaster, South Carolina
Date:1908
Medium:Gelatin silver print

Dimensions:10 1/2 x 13 1/2" (26.7 x 34.3 cm)

Kids and adults being vaccinated for measles, typhoid or Polio. This former American rite of passage includes grimacing children, others restrained by parents or physicians, lines of military personnel awaiting the needle, kids with lollipops, and a picture of a sad-eyed chihuahua being innoculated, too. Silver prints, 10x8 inches (25.4x20.3 cm.),

ATGET, EUGÈNE (1857-1927)/ABBOTT, BERENICE (1898-1991) 
"La Villette, fille publique faisant le quart, 19e [La Villette, Streetwalker Waiting for a Client, 19th arrondissement]." Silver print, 9 1/8x6 7/8 inches (23.2x17.5 cm.), with Abbott's Photograph by Eugene [sic] Atget hand stamp, on mount verso. 1921; printed circa 1940s

Eugène Atget (12 February 1857 – 4 August 1927) was a French flâneur and a pioneer of documentary photography, noted for his determination to document all of the architecture and street scenes of Paris before their disappearance to modernization. Most of his photographs were first published by Berenice Abbott after his death.[2] An inspiration for the surrealists and other artists, his genius was only recognized by a handful of young artists in the last two years of his life, and he did not live to see the wide acclaim his work would eventually receive
LANGE, DOROTHEA (1895-1965) 

Oklahoma Dust Bowl. Silver print, 6 7/8x9 3/4 inches (17.5x24.8 cm.), with Lange's Resettlement Administration credit hand stamp, a RA number hand stamp, and the RA number again, in pencil, in an unknown hand, on verso. 1935


Dorothea Lange (May 26, 1895 – October 11, 1965) was an influential American documentary photographer and photojournalist, best known for her Depression-era work for the Farm Security Administration (FSA). Lange's photographs humanized the consequences of the Great Depression and influenced the development of documentary photography.


PARKS, GORDON (1912-2006) 

Children with doll. Silver print, 8 7/811 7/8 inches (22.5x30.2 cm.), with Parks' signature, in black ink, on recto. 1942; printed 1980s


Gordon Parks (November 30, 1912 – March 7, 2006) was an American photographer, musician, writer and film director. He is best remembered for his photographic essays for Life magazine and as the director of the 1971 film Shaft.


MORATH, INGE (1923-2002) 
"Bedouins Dancing, South of Baghdad". Silver print, approximately 8 5/8x13 inches (21.9x33 cm.), with Morath's signature and title, in pencil, on recto. 1956 and 1955; printed 1980s

Ingeborg Hermine "Inge" Morath (May 27, 1923 – January 30, 2002) was an Austrian-born photographer. In 1953, she joined the Magnum Photos Agency, founded by top photographers in Paris, and became a full photographer with them in 1955. In 1955, she published her first collection of photographs, a total of 30 monographs during her lifetime. Morath was also the third and last wife of playwright Arthur Miller; their daughter is screenwriter/director Rebecca Miller.




Acknowledgment: Swann Auction Galleries, MoMA,