Saturday, November 19, 2016

18 Paintings of Paris, by its Artists from 1850-1910 - Part 5 - With Footnotes

Paris, France's capital, is a major European city and a global center for art, fashion, gastronomy and culture. Its 19th-century cityscape is crisscrossed by wide boulevards and the River Seine. Beyond such landmarks as the Eiffel Tower and the 12th-century, Gothic Notre-Dame cathedral, the city is known for its cafe culture and designer boutiques along the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré. Wikipedia

Otto "von" (Ritter) Thoren (1828-1889)
Bois de Boulogne
Oil on canvas
9;4 x 13;8 inch
Private Collection

The Bois de Boulogne is a large public park located along the western edge of the 16th arrondissement of Paris. It was created between 1852 and 1858 during the reign of the Emperor Louis Napoleon.

It is the second-largest park in Paris. It covers an area of 845 hectares (2090 acres), which is about two and a half times the area of Central Park in New York.

Within the boundaries of the Bois de Boulogne are an English landscape garden with several lakes and a cascade; two smaller botanical and landscape gardens, the Château de Bagatelle and the Pré-Catelan; a zoo and amusement park in the Jardin d'Acclimatation; The Jardin des Serres d'Auteuil, a complex of greenhouses holding a hundred thousand plants; two tracks for horse racing, the Hippodrome de Longchamp and the Auteuil Hippodrome; a tennis stadium where the French Open tennis tournament is held each year; and other attractions. More

Otto von Thoren (21 July 1828 Vienna , 15 July 1889 in Paris) is an Austrian animal painter. He was the son of son of Francis Casimir Thoron and Constance Marie-Françoise Lochmann

Otto von Thoren was made an officer in 1846, participates in the Austrian Revolution of 1848 , he was captain of cuirassiers, then moved to Venice. In 1857, he completely turned to painting and studied for several years in Brussels and Paris .

In the mid 1860s, he was called to Vienna to paint the portrait of Franz Joseph I of Austria . After painting Death of Gustavus Adolphus , he turned to painting animals , particularly cattle grazing, where he is distinguished by his delicate nature observation.

The paintings of Otto von Thoren are often found in Austrian museums such as the Museum Heeresgeschichtliches (Military History Museum) in Vienna. More

Louis Marie De Schryver,  1862 - 1942
Place de la Concorde
Oil on canvas
15 x 21 3/4in (38.1 x 55.2cm)
Private Collection

The Place de la Concorde is one of the major public squares in Paris, France. Measuring 8.64 hectares (21.3 acres) in area. The place was designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel in 1755 as a moat-skirted octagon between the Champs-Élysées to the west and the Tuileries Garden to the east. Decorated with statues and fountains, the area was named Place Louis XV to honor the king at that time. The square showcased an equestrian statue of the king, which had been commissioned in 1748 by the city of Paris, sculpted mostly by Edmé Bouchardon, and completed by Jean-Baptiste Pigalle after the death of Bouchardon.

At the north end, two magnificent identical stone buildings were constructed. Separated by the rue Royale, these structures remain among the best examples of Louis Quinze style architecture. Initially, the eastern building served as the French Naval Ministry. Shortly after its construction, the western building became the opulent home of the Duc d'Aumont. It was later purchased by the Comte de Crillon, whose family resided there until 1907. The famous luxury Hôtel de Crillon, which currently occupies the building, took its name from its previous owners. More

Louis Marie de Schryver, 1862 - 1942Born in Paris in 1862, Louis Marie de Schryver began his artistic career under the tutelage of the portrait painter and orientalist Gabriel-Joseph-Marie-Augustin Ferrier. He exhibited for the first time at the Paris Salon at the young age of 13, showing two works, both still life canvases of flowers. 

The choice of subject would permeate throughout the entirety of his long career. He earned numerous awards from 1879 onwards, including a number of honorable mentions at the Salon, as well as the Universal Expositions of 1891, 1896 and 1900. Highly praised by both critics and the public alike, de Schryver enjoyed enormous success during his lifetime, and his works remain highly sought after. More

Louis Valtat, 1869 - 1952
Barques au bois de Boulogne
Oil on canvas
10 5/8 x 13 3/4 in
Private Collection

The Bois de Boulogne, see above

Louis Valtat was born in Dieppe on 8 August, 1869. He studied at le Lycée Hoche in Versailles where his parents lived. In 1886, when he was 17 years old, he applied for admission at the Ecole des Beaux Arts and completed his training at the Académie Julian where he made friends with Albert André and Pierre Bonnard.

In 1890, he won the Jauvin d’Attainville prize; he then set up his workshop at rue de La Glacière in Paris. In 1893, he took part in the Salon des Artistes Indépendants for the first time. His paintings covered one main theme: the life in the neighbouring streets. By the end of 1894, he achieved a scenery for the theater “l’Oeuvre” in collaboration with Toulouse Lautrec and with Albert André’s help at Lugné Poë’s request. Simultaneously, his engravings and paintings were exhibited at the Salon des Cent.

Valtat was suffering from pulmonary consumption, he often went to Banyuls for treatment where he met George-Daniel de Monfreid, who introduced him to Aristide Maillol. He went on several trips to Spain. Since the winter 1897-8, he used to spend the winter season in Agay, a small fishing village close to Saint Raphaël and, later on, in Anthéor, a few kilometers away. He was accompanied by Suzanne whom he married in 1900.

Valtat with his wife would live in his parents’ house in Versailles when they were not in Anthéor or in Normandy. However, in 1905, they moved to la Butte Montmartre, and in 1914 he moved close to l’Arc de Triomphe and to the Bois de Boulogne whose lakes very often appeared in his work.

In 1914, Louis Valtat stopped travelling to Antheor. going. In 1924, after 10 years of being deprived the pleasure of a garden, he bought a house in Choisel, a small village in the Chevreuse valley. He spent the major part of the year in that place.

By the time, he had received official recognition and was made chevalier of the Legion d’Honneur in 1927; at the 1951 exhibition on the Fauvism, which took place at the Modern Art National Museum in Paris, six of his paintings were shown among which no. 116, entitled “Arbres”. Since then, this painting seems to have gone a strange way.

After the 1940 exodus and the following years’ occupation, Louis Valtat had serious problems with his eyes (glaucoma) and seldom left his workshop located at l’avenue de Wagram, where he realized his last paintings dated 1948. More

Paul Signac, 1863 - 1935
Pont National, Paris, c. 1927
Watercolor and graphite on paper
9;4 x 13;8 inch
Private Collection

The pont National (named pont Napoléon-III from its construction until 1870) is a road and rail bridge across the Seine in Paris. It was built between 1852 and 1853 as a railway bridge (to allow the Petite Ceinture line to cross the river) and to link the "enceintes" on the two sides of the river. Its architects were E. Couche, Petit, Gaspard, and Netter. Its width was doubled with an addition on the upstream side in 1936. More

Paul Signac, (born Nov. 11, 1863, Paris, France—died Aug. 15, 1935, Paris) French painter who, with Georges Seurat, developed the technique called pointillism.
When he was 18, Signac gave up the study of architecture for painting and, through Armand Guillaumin, became a convert to the colouristic principles of Impressionism. In 1884 Signac helped found the Salon des Indépendants. There he met Seurat, whom he initiated into the broken-colour technique of Impressionism. The two went on to develop the method they called pointillism, which became the basis of Neo-Impressionism. They continued to apply pigment in minute dabs of pure colour, as had the Impressionists, but they adopted an exact, almost scientific system of applying the dots, instead of the somewhat intuitive application of the earlier masters. In watercolours Signac used the principle in a much freer manner. After 1886 he took part regularly in the annual Salon des Indépendants, to which he sent landscapes, seascapes, and decorative panels. Being a sailor, Signac traveled widely along the European coast, painting the landscapes he encountered. In his later years he painted scenes of Paris, Viviers, and other French cities.
Signac produced much critical writing and was the author of From Eugène Delacroix to Neo-Impressionism (1899) and Jongkind (1927). The former book is an exposition of pointillism, while the latter is an insightful treatise on watercolour painting. More

Maximilien Luce (1858–1941)
Le quai Saint-Michel, c. 1900
Oil on canvas
18 1/8 x 21 5/8 in
Private Collection

The Quai Saint-Michel is a path located along the Seine , in Paris , in the 5 th  arrondissement . More

Maximilien Luce (13 March 1858 – 6 February 1941) was a prolific French Neo-impressionist artist, known for his paintings, illustrations, engravings, and graphic art, and also for his anarchist activism. Starting as an engraver, he then concentrated on painting, first as an Impressionist, then as a Pointillist, and finally returning to Impressionism. More

Maximilien Luce (1858–1941)
Le Quai Saint-Michel et Notre-Dame, c. 1901
Oil on canvas
Height: 730 mm (28.74 in). Width: 600 mm (23.62 in).
Musée d'Orsay

The Quai Saint-Michel and Notre-Dame is a 1901 oil on canvas painting by the Maximilien Luce. Luce was part of the Neo-Impressionist movement between 1887 and 1897 and used the technique of employing separate dabs of colour, for the painting, which was one of ten he undertook of Notre Dame de Paris, painted by Luce when was moving from his Neo-Impressionist period to his later Populist period.

Notre-Dame de Paris is a medieval Catholic cathedral on the Île de la Cité in the fourth arrondissement of Paris. The cathedral is widely considered to be one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture, and is among the largest and most well-known church buildings in the world. The naturalism of its sculptures and stained glass are in contrast with earlier Romanesque architecture.

As the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Paris, Notre-Dame contains the cathedra of the Archbishop of Paris. The cathedral treasury contains a reliquary which houses some of Catholicism's most important relics, including the purported Crown of Thorns, a fragment of the True Cross, and one of the Holy Nails.

In the 1790s, Notre-Dame suffered desecration in the radical phase of the French Revolution when much of its religious imagery was damaged or destroyed. An extensive restoration supervised by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc began in 1845. A project of further restoration and maintenance began in 1991. More

Edouard Léon Cortès (1882–1969)
Le Moulin de la Galette
Oil on canvas
12 3/4 x 17 3/4 in
Private Collection

The Moulin de la Galette is a windmill and associated businesses situated near the top of the district of Montmartre in Paris. Since the 17th century the windmill has been known for more than just its milling capabilities. Nineteenth-century owners and millers, the Debray family, made a brown bread, galette, which became popular and thus the name of the windmill and its businesses, which have included a famous guinguette and restaurant. In the 19th century, Le Moulin de la Galette, represented diversion for Parisians seeking entertainment, a glass of wine and bread made from flour ground by the windmill. Artists, such as Renoir, van Gogh, and Pissarro have immortalized Le Moulin de la Galette; likely the most notable was Renoir's festive painting, Bal du moulin de la Galette (below). More

Edouard Léon Cortès (1882–1969) was a French post-impressionist artist of French and Spanish ancestry. He is known as "Le Poete Parisien de la Peinture" or "the Parisian Poet of Painting" because of his diverse Paris cityscapes in a variety of weather and night settings.
Cortes was born on August 8, 1882, in Lagny-sur-Marne, about twenty miles east of Paris. His father, Antonio Cortès, had been a painter for the Spanish Royal Court.
At the age of 17, Edouard began his studies at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. His first exhibition in 1901 brought him immediate recognition. Cortès stressed his independence. Once, in responding to a journalist who asked if he was a student of Luigi Loir, he replied in pun: "No, a student of myself only."
life he was awarded the prestigious Prix Antoine-Quinson from the Salon de Vincennes
In 1914 Cortès married Fernande Joyeuse, with whom he had a daughter in 1916.
Although Cortès was a pacifist, when war came close to his native village he was compelled to enlist in a French Infantry Regiment at the age of 32. As a contact agent Cortès was wounded by a bayonet, evacuated to a military hospital, and awarded the Croix de Guerre. After recovery he was the reassigned to utilize his artistic talent to sketch enemy positions. Later in life his convictions led him to refuse the Légion d'Honneur from the French Government. In 1919 he was demobilized.
His wife had died in 1918 and he soon married his sister-in-law Lucienne Joyeuse.
Cortès lived a simple life amid a close circle of friends. He died on November 28, 1969, in Lagny, and has a street named in his honor. More

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919)
Dance at Le Moulin de la Galette, c. 1876
Oil on canvas
131 × 175 cm (51.6 × 68.9 in)
Musée d'Orsay, Paris

Bal du moulin de la Galette is an 1876 painting by French artist Pierre-Auguste Renoir. It is housed at the Musée d'Orsay in Paris and is one of Impressionism's most celebrated masterpieces. The painting depicts a typical Sunday afternoon at Moulin de la Galette in the district of Montmartre in Paris. In the late 19th century, working class Parisians would dress up and spend time there dancing, drinking, and eating galettes into the evening.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, commonly known as Auguste Renoir (25 February 1841 – 3 December 1919), was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. As a celebrator of beauty, and especially feminine sensuality, it has been said that "Renoir is the final representative of a tradition which runs directly from Rubens to Watteau."
He was the father of actor Pierre Renoir (1885–1952), filmmaker Jean Renoir (1894–1979) and ceramic artist Claude Renoir (1901–69). He was the grandfather of the filmmaker Claude Renoir (1913–1993), son of Pierre. More

Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941)
The flower market along the quai of the Seine
Gouache and watercolor on paper
9 1/8 x 13 1/4 in
Private Collection

Located on Place Louis Lépine between the Notre-Dame Cathedral and Sainte-Chapelle chapel, the flower market has attracted avid gardeners and curious passersby since 1830. Both covered and open-air, the market is mainly formed by pavilions from the 1900s. Their selection is huge: seasonal flowers, exotic flowers, orchids, plants, shrubs ... a unique and endearing place for a walk. 

There are two other flower markets in Paris: Place de la Madeleine, and Place des Ternes . More

Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941) was a French artist of French-Italian parents and was born in Paris on December 11, 1854. He was a populariser of street scenes, usually painted in autumn or winter. His paintings of the early 1900s accurately represent the era in which he lived: a happy, bustling Paris, la Belle Époque, with horse-drawn carriages, trolley cars and its first omnibuses. Galien-Laloue's works are valued not only for their contribution to 20th-century art, but for the actual history, which they document. His work can be seen at the Musée des Beaux-Arts, Louvier; Musée des Beaux-Arts, La Rochelle; Mulhouse, France.

A typical Galien-Laloue painting depicts sidewalks and avenues crowded with people or tourists mingling before the capital's monuments. He also painted the landscapes of Normandy and Seine-et-Marne, as well as military scenes he was commissioned to produce in 1914. The Republic of France selected Galien-Laloue to work as a 'war artist,' both during the Franco-Prussian War and World War I, chiefly in watercolor. More

Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941)
L'eglise Saint-Augustin
Gouache and watercolor on paper
18.5x30 cm
Private Collection

The Église Saint-Augustin de Paris (Church of St. Augustine) is a Catholic church located at 46 boulevard Malesherbes in the 8th arrondissement of Paris. The church was designed to provide a prominent vista at the end of the boulevard both of which were built during Haussmann's renovation of Paris under the Second French Empire. More

Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941), see above

Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941)
La Madeleine
Gouache and watercolor on paper
19x32 cm
Private Collection

L'église de la Madeleine, Madeleine Church; less formally, just La Madeleine; is a Roman Catholic church occupying a commanding position in the 8th arrondissement of Paris. The Madeleine Church was designed in its present form as a temple to the glory of Napoleon's army. To its south lies the Place de la Concorde, to the east is the Place Vendôme, and to the west Saint-Augustin. More

Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941), see above

Jean Béraud (1849–1935)
Sortant De La Madeleine, Paris
Oil on panel
23.5 × 31.8 cm (9.3 × 12.5 in)
Private collection

Jean Béraud (French: January 12, 1848 – October 4, 1935) was a French painter renowned for his numerous paintings depicting the life of Paris, and the nightlife of Paris society. Pictures of the Champs Elysees, cafés, Montmartre and the banks of the Seine are precisely detailed illustrations of everyday Parisian life during the "Belle Époque". He also painted religious subjects in a contemporary setting. More

 Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941)
Les quais du Louvre
Gouache and watercolor on paper
18.5x30.5 cm
Private Collection

The Quai François Mitterrand is a quay by the River Seine in Paris, France, along the stretch where the Palais du Louvre is situated. Formerly Quai du Louvre, it was renamed Quai François Mitterrand after the former French president on October 26, 2003. More

Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941), see above

Jean Dufy (March 12, 1888 – May 12, 1964) 
Montmartre, Le Sacré-Coeur
Oil on canvas
15 x 18 1/8 in
Private Collection

Jean Dufy (b Le Havre, France, 1888; d La Boissière, 1964) French Painter. Following his service in the military, from 1910-1912, Jean Dufy relocated to Paris. Inspired by the work of Braque and Picasso, Dufy created watercolors that expressed a heightened understanding of color and light. In the mid-1920s, Jean Dufy became captivated by the music of the time, such as Darius Millaud and Francis Poulenc, and incorporated this interest into his artwork. While depicting orchestral and musical subjects, Dufy later became enchanted by the coast of Northern France and began to create majestic and effecting landscapes. Throughout the 1950s Dufy explored Western Europe and North America, but inevitably returned to his watercolors and oils of Paris. Just two months after the death of his wife, Ismérie, Jean Dufy died in 1964 in La BoissiereMore

Jean Dufy (March 12, 1888 – May 12, 1964) 
ÎLE DE LA CITÉ, PARIS
oil on canvas
49.8 by 61cm., 19 5/8 by 24in.
Private Collection

The Île de la Cité is one of two remaining natural islands in the Seine within the city of Paris. It is the centre of Paris and the location where the medieval city was refounded.

The western end has held a palace since Merovingian times, and its eastern end since the same period has been consecrated to religion, especially after the 10th century construction of a cathedral preceding today's Notre Dame. The land between the two was, until the 1850s, largely residential and commercial, but has since been filled by the city's Prefecture de Police, Palais de Justice, Hôtel-Dieu hospital and Tribunal de commerce. Only the westernmost and northeastern extremities of the island remain residential today, and the latter preserves some vestiges of its 16th-century canon's houses. The Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation, a memorial to the 200,000 people deported from Vichy France to the Nazi concentration camps during the Second World War, is located at the upriver end of the island. More

Jean Dufy (March 12, 1888 – May 12, 1964) see above


Edouard Léon Cortès (1882–1969)
Bouquinistes along the Seine
Oil on canvas
13 x 18in (33 x 45.8cm)
Private Collection

The Bouquinistes of Paris, France, are booksellers of used and antiquarian books who ply their trade along large sections of the banks of the Seine: on the right bank from the Pont Marie to the Quai du Louvre, and on the left bank from the Quai de la Tournelle to Quai Voltaire. The Seine is thus described as 'the only river in the world that runs between two bookshelves' More

Edouard Léon Cortès (1882–1969), see above

Antoine Blanchard, (15 November 1910 – 1988) 
Le Théâtre du Châtelet
Oil on canvas
13 x 18in (33 x 45.7cm)
Private Collection

The Théâtre du Châtelet is a theatre and opera house, located in the place du Châtelet in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France.
The theatre is one of two apparent twins constructed along the quays of the Seine, facing each other across the open Place du Châtelet and its ornate fountain. Their external architecture is essentially Palladian entrances under arcades. At the centre of the plaza is a sphinx-endowed fountain, erected in 1808, which commemorates Napoleon's victory in Egypt. More

Antoine Blanchard is the pseudonym under which the French painter Marcel Masson (15 November 1910 – 1988) painted his immensely popular Parisian street scenes. He was born in a small village near the banks of the Loire.
Blanchard received his initial artistic training at the Beaux-Arts in Rennes, Brittany. He then moved to Paris in 1932 where he joined the Ecole des Beaux-Arts. He won the Prix de Rome.
Like Édouard Cortès (1882–1969) and Eugène Galien-Laloue (1854–1941), Antoine Blanchard essentially painted Paris and the Parisians in bygone days, often from vintage postcards. The artist began painting his Paris street scenes in the late 1950s, and like Cortès, often painted the same Paris landmark many times, in different weather conditions or various seasons. The most recurrent topics were views of the capital city in cloudy or rainy days, showing streets busy with pedestrians in a rush to go home, and bright storefronts reflecting on wet streets.
Antoine Blanchard died in 1988. More

Antoine Blanchard, (15 November 1910 – 1988) 
La Place Vendôme
Oil on canvas
13 x 18 in
Private Collection

Place Vendôme is a square in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, located to the north of the Tuileries Gardens and east of the Église de la Madeleine. It is the starting point of the Rue de la Paix. Its regular architecture by Jules Hardouin-Mansart and pedimented screens canted across the corners give the rectangular Place Vendôme the aspect of an octagon. The original Vendôme Column at the centre of the square was erected by Napoleon I to commemorate the Battle of Austerlitz; it was torn down on 16 May 1871, by decree of the Paris Commune, but subsequently re-erected and remains a prominent feature on the square today. More

Antoine Blanchard, (15 November 1910 – 1988) see above

Antoine Blanchard, (15 November 1910 – 1988) 
La Porte Saint Denis
Oil on canvas
13 x 18 in
Private Collection

The Porte Saint-Denis is a Parisian monument located in the 10th arrondissement, at the site of one of the gates of the Wall of Charles V, one of the now-destroyed fortifications of Paris. It is located at the crossing of the Rue Saint-Denis continued by the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Denis, with the Boulevard de Bonne-Nouvelle and the Boulevard Saint-Denis.

The Porte Saint-Denis was designed by architect François Blondel and the sculptor Michel Anguier at the order of Louis XIV in honor of his victories on the Rhine and in Franche-Comté. Built in 1672 and paid for by the city of Paris, it replaced a medieval gate in the city walls built by Charles V in the 14th century.

A monument defining the official art of its epoque, the Porte Saint-Denis provided the subject of the engraved frontispiece to Blondel's influential Cours d'architecture, 1698. It was restored in 1988. More

Antoine Blanchard, (15 November 1910 – 1988) see above

Antoine Blanchard, (15 November 1910 – 1988) 
Le Moulin Rouge a Montmartre en 1900
Oil on canvas
13 1/4 x 18 1/4 in
Private Collection

Moulin Rouge, (French for "Red Mill") is a cabaret in Paris. The original house, which burned down in 1915, was co-founded in 1889 by Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller, who also owned the Paris Olympia. Close to Montmartre in the Paris district of Pigalle on Boulevard de Clichy in the 18th arrondissement, it is marked by the red windmill on its roof.

Moulin Rouge is best known as the spiritual birthplace of the modern form of the can-can dance. Originally introduced as a seductive dance by the courtesans who operated from the site, the can-can dance revue evolved into a form of entertainment of its own and led to the introduction of cabarets across Europe. Today, the Moulin Rouge is a tourist attraction, offering musical dance entertainment for visitors from around the world. The club's decor still contains much of the romance of fin de siècle France. More

Antoine Blanchard, (15 November 1910 – 1988) see above

JOHN YOUNG JOHNSTONE, A.R.C.A.
PARIS, 1914
Oil on panel
 ins x 7.25 ins; 22.2 cms x 18.4 cms
Private Collection

John Young Johnstone was born in Montreal and studied under William  Brymner at the Art Association Montreal 1908-1912 after which he attended the Academie de la Grand Chaumiere in Paris 1912-1913. He showed annually with the Arts Association Montreal ( 1911-1925), with the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts ( 1915-1923) and taught art at several Montreal institutions.

He travelled to Cuba in 1929 where he died in Havana in1930. More




Acknowledgement: BONHAMS NEW YORK

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