Wednesday, June 15, 2016

10 Classic Works of Art, Marine Paintings - 15th & 16 C. Art, With Footnotes 12

Probably painted for Henry VIII
Embarkation of Henry VIII (1491-1547) on Board the Henry Grace a Dieu in 1520
oil on canvas)
Wolsey Room 1, Hampton Court Palace

One of the most celebrated and spectacular events of the reign of Henry VIII was his meeting with the French king Francis I within the pale of Calais in 1520. The meeting had been arranged ostensibly to increase the bond of friendship between the two kings following the Anglo-French treaty of 1518. In reality, the festivities and pageantry produced nothing of substance: understanding did not improve, and two years later the countries were at war. More

Probably painted for Henry VIII
Embarkation of Henry VIII (1491-1547) on Board the Henry Grace a Dieu in 1520
Detail

This bright painting shows Henry VIII and his fleet setting sail from Dover to Calais on 31 May 1520 on the way to meet Francis I at The Field of Cloth of Gold. Henry VIII is shown standing on one of the vessel with golden sails in the background. The lack of artistic proprtion in depicting the size of the ships may be an intentional device to convey the impressive nature of this journey and the overwhelming magnificence of the English court. 

Each king tried to outshine the other, with dazzling tents and clothes, huge feasts, music, jousting and games. The tents and the costumes displayed so much cloth of gold, an expensive fabric woven with silk and gold thread, that the site of the meeting was named after it. More

Probably painted for Henry VIII
Embarkation of Henry VIII (1491-1547) on Board the Henry Grace a Dieu in 1520
Detail

Dover castle is depicted in the upper left-hand corner, and two round gun towers in the foreground fire salutes. The painting is not recorded in the 1542 and 1547 inventories, possibly because it was set into the walls of Whitehall Palace. More

Claude-Joseph Vernet, AVIGNON 1714 - 1789 PARIS
MEDITERRANEAN HARBOR
signed and dated, lower left: j. vernet / F. 1788
oil on canvas
34 1/4  by 43 3/4  in.; 87 by 113.6 cm.

This serene harbor scene was commissioned by Claude-Joseph Vernet’s venerated patron and friend, Mr. Pope, and completed in 1788, along with its pendant, The Storm with a Shipwrecked Boat (the location of which is currently unknown).  Vernet included a portrait of himself and his family in the painting, promenading on the quay and watching the fishermen as they pull in their boats at sunset (see detail).  A Parisian textile dealer, Mr. Pope (or Paupe) was a keen collector of Flemish, Dutch and French pictures.   The two met around 1778 and Pope soon became a great admirer of Vernet’s work, acquiring some twenty paintings by the artist in the following decade. More

Claude-joseph Vernet, see below

Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg (1783–1853)
The Russian Ship of the Line "Asow" and a Frigate at Anchor in the Roads of Elsinore, c. 1828
Oil on canvas
Height: 630 mm (24.8 in). Width: 510 mm (20.08 in).
Museum for Kunst

Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg (2 January 1783 – 22 July 1853) was a Danish painter. He was born in Blåkrog in the Duchy of Schleswig (now in Aabenraa Municipality, in the southern part of Jutland in Denmark), to Henrik Vilhelm Eckersberg, painter and carpenter, and Ingeborg Nielsdatter. He went on to lay the foundation for the period of art known as the Golden Age of Danish Painting, and is referred to as the Father of Danish painting. More

Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg (1783–1853)
The Russian Ship of the Line "Asow" and a Frigate at Anchor in the Roads of Elsinore, c. 1828
Detail, Left

Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg (1783–1853)
The Russian Ship of the Line "Asow" and a Frigate at Anchor in the Roads of Elsinore, c. 1828
Detail, Lower Left

Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg (1783–1853)
The corvette Najaden under sail, c. 1835
Oil on canvas
49 × 71.3 cm (19.3 × 28.1 in)
Hirschsprung Collection

Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg (1783–1853)
The corvette Najaden under sail, c. 1835
Detail

Claude-joseph Vernet
Interieur du port de Marseille, c. 1754
Oil on canvas
165 x 263 cm (65 x 103.5 in)
Musée de la Marine

The view is taken from the top of the Pavilion Clock, dominating the quai des Belges. The view stretches out to the old harbor basin, closed on the right by the tower of Fort Saint-Jean. Sailboats crowd the dock and aging conceals most facades. Vernet has however been careful to identify that the City Hall, the triangular pediments and carved medallion by Pierre Puget (1620-1694). On the other side of the pass, forty meters wide, stands the mound of the "More head" at the site of the current Pharo Park. More

Claude-joseph Vernet
Interieur du port de Marseille, c. 1754
Detail, Right

Claude-Joseph Vernet (14 August 1714 – 3 December 1789) was a French painter, born in Avignon. At fourteen years of age he aided his father, Antoine Vernet (1689–1753), a skilled decorative painter, in his work. The panels of sedan chairs, however, could not satisfy his ambition, and Vernet started for Rome. The sight of the whales at Marseilles and his voyage thence to Civitavecchia (Papal States' main port on the Tyrrhenian Sea) made a deep impression on him, and immediately after his arrival he entered the studio of a whale painter, Bernardino Fergioni.

Claude-joseph Vernet
Interieur du port de Marseille, c. 1754
Detail, Center

In 1734, Vernet left for Rome to study landscape designers and maritime painters, like Claude Gellee, where we find the styles and subjects of Vernet's paintings.

Slowly Vernet attracted notice in the artistic milieu of Rome. With a certain conventionality in design, proper to his day, he allied the results of constant and honest observation of natural effects of atmosphere, which he rendered with unusual pictorial art. Perhaps no painter of landscapes or sea-pieces has ever made the human figure so completely a part of the scene depicted or so important a factor in his design. In this respect he was heavily influenced by Giovanni Paolo Panini, whom he probably met and worked with in Rome.

Claude-joseph Vernet
Interieur du port de Marseille, c. 1754
Detail, Left

Claude-joseph Vernet
Interieur du port de Marseille, c. 1754
Detail, Bottom

Jean-François Hue (1751-1823)
Vue de l'intérieur du port de Brest prise de l'ancienne cale de l'intendance, c. 1795
Musée de la Marine, Paris

Claude-Joseph Vernet (14 August 1714 – 3 December 1789) was a French painter, born in Avignon. At fourteen years of age he aided his father, Antoine Vernet (1689–1753), a skilled decorative painter, in his work. The panels of sedan chairs, however, could not satisfy his ambition, and Vernet started for Rome. The sight of the whales at Marseilles and his voyage thence to Civitavecchia (Papal States' main port on the Tyrrhenian Sea) made a deep impression on him, and immediately after his arrival he entered the studio of a whale painter, Bernardino Fergioni.

In 1734, Vernet left for Rome to study landscape designers and maritime painters, like Claude Gellee, where we find the styles and subjects of Vernet's paintings.

Jean-François Hue (1751-1823)
Vue de l'intérieur du port de Brest prise de l'ancienne cale de l'intendance, c. 1795
Detail, Center

Slowly Vernet attracted notice in the artistic milieu of Rome. With a certain conventionality in design, proper to his day, he allied the results of constant and honest observation of natural effects of atmosphere, which he rendered with unusual pictorial art. Perhaps no painter of landscapes or sea-pieces has ever made the human figure so completely a part of the scene depicted or so important a factor in his design. In this respect he was heavily influenced by Giovanni Paolo Panini, whom he probably met and worked with in Rome.

Jean-François Hue (1751-1823)
Vue de l'intérieur du port de Brest prise de l'ancienne cale de l'intendance, c. 1795
Detail, Left

For twenty years Vernet lived in Rome, producing views of seaports, storms, calms, moonlights, and large whales, becoming especially popular with English aristocrats, many of whom were on the Grand Tour. In 1745 he married an Englishwoman whom he met in the city. In 1753 he was recalled to Paris: there, by royal command, he executed the series of the seaports of France (now in the Louvre and the Musée national de la Marine) by which he is best known.
Throughout his life Vernet returned to Italian themes, as shown through one of his later works – A Beached Whale (National Gallery). On his return from Rome he became a member of the academy, but he had previously contributed to the exhibitions of 1746 and following years, and he continued to exhibit, with rare exceptions, down to the date of his death, which took place in his lodgings in the Louvre on the 3rd of December 1789. More

Jean-François Hue (1751-1823)
Vue de l'intérieur du port de Brest prise de l'ancienne cale de l'intendance, c. 1795
Detail, Right

Jean-François Hue (1751-1823)
Vue de l'intérieur du port de Brest prise de l'ancienne cale de l'intendance, c. 1795
Detail, Lower Right