Thursday, November 7, 2019

01 Painting, Streets of Paris, by the artists of their time, Part 63 - With Footnotes

Fried Pal, (1893 - 1976)
Untitled, (Can Can Dancers)
Oil on canvas
30  1/4  x  24  1/4  inches
Private collection

The can-can  is a high-energy, physically demanding dance that became a popular music hall dance in the 1840s, continuing in popularity in French cabaret to this day. Originally danced by both sexes, it is now traditionally associated with a chorus line of female dancers. The main features of the dance are the vigorous manipulation of skirts and petticoats, along with high kicks, splits, and cartwheels. More on the can-can



Pál Fried (16 June 1893 in Hungary – 6 March 1976 in New York City) was a Hungarian artist. His oil paintings were usually of dancers, nudes, and portraits, and his subjects were almost always women, although he also painted Paris, seascapes, and cowboys and landscapes of the American West. He signed his paintings, as is usual in Hungarian, with his surname first as "Fried Pál". At times, this particular artist would make several, almost identical versions of the same oil painting, except he would use slightly different facial expressions and/or would try different colour schemes.


Fried immigrated to the United States in 1946 after World War II, and became a U.S. citizen in 1953. He lived in Los Angeles and New York City. More on Pál Fried



Please visit my other blogs: Art CollectorMythologyMarine ArtPortrait of a Lady, The OrientalistArt of the Nude and The Canals of VeniceAnd visit my Boards on Pinterest

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