Sunday, August 30, 2015

Classic Works of Art, Marine and Seascape Paintings - Brian Coole - (British-American, b. 1939), BOSTON HARBOR

Brian Coole - (British-American, b. 1939)
BOSTON HARBOR
signed Brian Coole (lower right)
oil on board
19 by 29 1/2 in.

Although Brian Coole, is entirely self-taught, his ship paintings have been compared to the ship paintings of Fitz Hugh Lane, a renowned 19th century American artist who is best known for his Marine themed works and ship ‘portraits’. In 2001 Brian Coole was commissioned to paint three ship portraits for the British Royal Naval Museum, Portsmouth, UK.

More Marine Art

12 comments:

  1. Why is there minimal biography available anywhere on this wonderful artist?Is it a known artist painting a different genre under an assumed name?Could it be an artist from a different country like China or Russia painting and selling to the U.S. and British audience?

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    1. Unfortunately this all I found about Brian Coole!!! He is very well appreciated, but no published biography.

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  2. These paintings by "Brian Coole" appear at auctions all over the United States. I don't know for sure but I suspect they are shipped to them. I once saw a comment about this actually being the work of foreign (I forget, Indonesia?) art operations akin to a factory .. churning them out. This comment was on askart.com under that artist and the commenter stated he had notified the attorney general's office in his state. I have searched exhaustively online for any and I mean ANY real information on this alleged painter.. to NO avail..other than a very loose reference to his son being a motorcycle artist.. and allegedly a Museum in Greenwich, England having his art in its collection. Some of these paintings are quite well done and obviously the market is eating them up. Auction houses seem to be keeping tight lips about it. I am HIGHLY skeptical this is a real individual.

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  3. Some points to keep in mind .. they only started appearing on the market maybe in the last 15 years that I can recall. Now they are appearing with increased frequency, popping up auctions from New England to Texas, etc. The signature, in red, also bears a resemblance to other marine paintings I have seen in the same red and same style but different names.

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    1. Thank you for your note! Personally I would not be surprised. I have come across a lot of forgeries in the past, but usually of works by high demand artists; but one never knows.

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  4. Some of the smaller battle scenes are actually quite nice even though all of the works are pretty formulaic. I wouldn't mind owning one of these good ones only since they can be acquired at a much more reasonable price than say a painting by Thomas Birch. I just would appreciate more transparency on the part of dealers and auction houses. The same 3 or 4 sentence "Biography" is simply repeated / regurgitated online over and over.

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  5. Looks like our boy Brian has ventured into yachting race scenes now .. (see link below). Brand new board covered with paper from 1909 despite Brian being "born" in 1939 ..lol.

    https://www.invaluable.com/auction-lot/brian-coole-united-states-united-kingdom-b-193-5ED499F97C

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  6. The above yachting scene sold for hammer price of $600. So imagine Brian slaving over this oil, then finding an antique frame to put it in, then shipping it overseas (costly!) ..to get $600 minus the auction house commission, say 20% conservatively .. so $480. Lol he would be lucky if he broke even. These are appearing all over the country in increasing numbers. Has the feel of an assembly line process. But auction houses will continue to parrot the same "biography", Brian will never be seen by anyone, anywhere and will continue to be a prolific painter who doesn't mind taking a bath on his hard work ..

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  7. The $600 is not what the artist gets, but the owner of the painting whose auctioning it off. Naturally the price will depend a great deal on the name recognition of the artist in the city or country of the sale, the auction house, the condition of the work

    A new painting today, by a new artist, will cost you about $3000. Try and sell it...

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  8. Yes, understood. Since these paintings are hitting auction houses simultaneously all over the US, I assume they aren't suddenly being sold by collectors who paid retail for them and are just tired of them. They are being shipped and sold by the ever elusive "Brian" ...

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